Thou shalt tweet responsibly!

By Daragh Cassidy

We all know of The Ten Commandments but how many of us know The Nine Twitter Commandments?

A Church of England diocese has made a first by issuing a list of Twitter ‘commandments’ to its staff and clergy, such as urging them to consider God when tweeting to the masses!

The Bath and Wells diocese said it had compiled the nine rules to help “spread the word of God in the most effective way”.

The guidelines range from practical security advice to more faith-based instructions, such as asking would-be religious tweeters to ask themselves: “Would I want God to read this?” before they type anything.

The diocese also advises staff not to hide behind anonymous profiles and to always reveal their identity. Other rules stipulate that users shouldn’t divulge too much personal information when tweeting, that they should always respect the law, and to remember that tweeting can leave a permanent digital footprint.

Diocese’s nine Twitter commandments

  • Don’t rush in
  • Remember tweets are transient yet permanent
  • Be a good ambassador for the Church
  • Don’t hide behind anonymity
  • Be aware of public/private life boundaries
  • Maintain a professional distance
  • Stay within the law
  • Respect confidentiality
  • Be mindful of your own security

In fairness, it all sounds like pretty good advice, which anyone could do well to consider, regardless of their religious affiliations! Although compared to The Ten Commandments some of the rules do seem a bit on the dull side, no? And whether God approves of the new rules we’ve yet to be told!

However, the Church of England should at least be given credit for recognising (like any other organisation should) the importance of a well-defined social media policy and the value of educating staff on how best to use the medium.

So what next for the Church and digital marketers…The Eight PPC Google AdWords Commandments?

Might I suggest the first?

“Thou shalt not waste copious amounts of money bidding ridiculous sums on everyday keywords!”

Google

The tweeting Great White sharks

By Daragh Cassidy

great-white-shark-smile

Authorities in Western Australia have found a novel way to warn people about the dangers of swimming in the country’s shark-infested waters. They’ve created a Twitter account for sharks which automatically posts tweets whenever they come into close contact with beaches!

Scientists have attached small transmitters to hundreds of sharks in the region, including Great Whites, to monitor their movements near public beaches. Whenever the sharks swim within about a one kilometre distance of a beach, the transmitter triggers an automatic alert which is picked up by a computer. The computer then sends out a tweet from the Surf Life Saving Western Australia’s Twitter account (@SLSWA) to warn surfers and beach goers about the potential dangers.

Screenshot 2014-01-14 12.11.14The tweet even gives the size and breed of the shark, and its approximate location. Each transmitter can last up to a decade so they also provide a huge amount of invaluable scientific information about the behaviour and migration patterns of sharks.

Sharks are common around most of Australia’s shores and the country’s love of surfing and the outdoors, combined with its great weather, means people spend a lot of time in the water and more and more surfers and swimmers are coming into ever closer contact with the fish. The unfortunate result is that shark attacks on people are on the increase around Australia and Western Australia is now the world’s deadliest place for shark attacks. In November a surfer, Chris Boyd, was fatally attacked by a shark and became the sixth person to be killed by a shark in the region in just two years.

Recently there has been huge debate in Australia about how to tackle the problem of shark attacks. Some Australians have called for the widespread culling of sharks to be reintroduced in order to control their numbers; a practice outlawed decades ago in order to protect the once endangered species. However environmentalists and animal rights campaigners have vigorously opposed any moves to reintroduce the legal killing of the fish, calling the idea senseless and unwarranted. But with shark attacks on the rise, something needs to be done.

Authorities in Australia have long patrolled beaches for sharks using helicopters and boats but there was often a delay in relaying the information to beach goers. The recent spate of attacks has prompted local government to try think of new, and more efficient ways, of warning people about potential dangers and preventing incidents. Using Twitter, which warns people of the dangers almost instantly, and leaves the sharks alone, seems like the perfect way to protect the lives of beach goers…and save the sharks too!

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